Monday, May 27, 2013

Fort Wayne Community Schools Cuts Hours of Part-time Workers to Avoid Requirement that the District Pay Their Health Insurance

The Fort Wayne Journal-Gazette reports:
Fort Wayne Community Schools is trimming the hours of more than 600 part-time teaching aides and cafeteria workers in response to a projected budget shortfall and to the requirements of the Affordable Care Act, a school official said.

FWCS chief financial officer Kathy Friend said the school district is dropping 610 employees from 30 hours per week to 25 hours per week starting June 3, rather than provide them with health insurance. Doing so would have cost the district $10 million, a price tag it cannot afford, Friend said.

Beginning in 2014, the Affordable Care Act, often referred to as Obamacare, will require employers to offer health insurance to employees who work more than 30 hours per week.

Liberals always think there will be no employment consequences when it comes to employer mandates, including things like requiring employers provide health insurance or raising the minimum wage.  But there always is.

10 comments:

Nicolas Martin said...

On the plus side, many of these workers are the sort that the schools have larded on over the decades, driving up school costs, and adding nothing to the quality of education, as judged by student performance.

Your overall point is well-taken.

Paul K. Ogden said...

Nah, Nic, these are the people working in cafeterias and acting as school bus monitors. They're not the extremely well paid bloated bureaucrats that dominate school administrations.

Flogger said...

The Health Care plans in other countries in Western Europe, Japan among others should have been given a fair hearing when Obama Care was still on the table. There was no hearing at all.

At least from the information I can find health care costs less per person in Western Europe and Japan and Longevity is as good if not better that USA.

Our new Hospitals have the look of Club Med, or a Cruise Ship. I want good health care at a hospital not all the trappings of a big hotel.

Jeff Cox said...

Patients in a hospital don't want to feel like they're in a hospital. They would rather feel like they're in a big hotel. It makes them more comfortable, helps their morale, and therefore helps the recovery process.

Jon said...

The US has some of highest medical costs in the world and mediocre results. Compare mortality rates in the US to other countries and it is readily apparent that our health care is more sizzle than steak.

Paul K. Ogden said...

I don't think longevity is the best way to measure the quality of health care. Americans don't have as a life span as people in other countries, quite possibly due to other factors, such as poor diet and a lack of exercise. Americans are some of the fattest people in the world. Can't blame our health care for that.

Nicolas Martin said...

Paul, the article refers to "teaching aids," a previously non-existent category of workers that has grown tremendously to no demonstrable academic benefit.

Nicolas Martin said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Nicolas Martin said...

Jeff Cox, can you provide some evidence that more opulent hospitals help the recovery process?

Those fancy American hospitals are teeming with resistant bacteria that threaten the health of patients, and deaths due to medical errors are in the tens of thousands. I doubt very much that the glamour of the facility has a substantive effect on recovery.

Niomi Flouring said...

What a lovely written blog! Check out my site: skin tightening